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Monday, 5 September 2016

FSN – A Magical Acupuncture for Pain Release

Tiejun Tang

FSN is an abbreviation of Fu's Subcutaneous Needle. It is a relatively new acupuncture technique invented by Dr.Zhonghua Fu in 1996. In the past 20 years this new technique has had a rapid development in China and is gradually getting more and more popular around the world.  
Originating from Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), FSN does not follow the rules and principles of TCM, and the chosen insertion points do not coincide with traditional acupuncture points. Although both needles are manipulated and act on soft connective tissue, FSN involves the insertion of a special patent needle horizontally in and around the affected area, rather than perpendicularly in way of meridians.
Although FSN’s clinical indications include the treatment of many diseases and their symptoms, the treatment of pain related diseases are most effective in my practice. It has shown much better effect compared to ordinary acupuncture. In acute conditions, FSN usually can release the pain immediately after the first session, whilst in chronic conditions it also showed a significant improvement after a few sessions. I have found that many pain cases which failed in ordinary acupuncture could be relieved by FSN. The reasons for the pain could be due to different diagnosis including: sciatica, lumbar muscle over strain, tennis elbow, golf elbow, cervical spondylosis, carpal tunnel syndrome, frozen shoulder, fibromyalgia, migraine, stomachache and dysmenorrhea.
FSN is an innovation for the treatment of myofascial pain and trigger points based on the research and clinical findings of Dr. D. Simons and Dr. Janet G. Travell. The effects that FSN have on the body are by means of mechanotransduction as the swinging of the needle triggers a response on the connective tissue, specifically the collagen fibres, by stimulating signal transduction and gene expression in fibroblasts of the subcutaneous tissue.[1] A drawing or magnetic effect on connective tissue has been observed upon needle manipulation as the contraction and shape changes of fibroblasts cause pulling of collagen fibres and secondary alignment of fibroblasts and collagen fibres.[2] During manipulation of the needle, collagen fibres would wind and tighten around the needle shaft,and dispersing of nociceptive substances and PH balance has also been observed in skeletal muscles[3] . The mechanisms of FSN still need further investigation.
The inventor of FSN Mr. Zhonghua Fu is a long term friend and colleague of mine. We used to work in the same University hospital 20 years ago. He was a very clever and diligent young man when I met him and he has dedicated himself to the invention and developmentof FSN since then.
I had serious concerns when I first encountered FSN, even doubting its effect, because it is so different from traditional acupuncture. In the past 20 years Zhonghua gradually changed my opinion on FSN by his excellent work. After I applied FSN on my patients, the magical results convinced me of its effectiveness. The use of FSN gives greater confidence that successful pain mitigation will be achieved.
Reference :

  1. Langevin, H.M. "Subcutaneous tissue fibroblasts cytoskeletal remodeling induced by acupuncture: evidence for a mechanotransduction-based mechanism". J Cell Physiol 2006; (3) 207
  2. Langevin, H.M..  "Mechanical signalling through connective tissue: A mechanism for the therapeutic effect of acupuncture". 2001; FASEB J (1) 15.
  3.  Anderson, G.B.  "Epidemiological features of chronic low back pain". 1999; The Lancet (1) 354